antique samurai armor

Nanban Tosei GusokuIncorporating a cabasset helmetEarly Edo period, 16th-17th century European armor was brought into Japan through trade with Spain and Portugal in the 16th century. With the introduction of firearms, the Japanese would, in fact, imitate those suits of armor, designed to deflect bullets, and began producing them in Japan, which were collectively called nanban (“Southern barbarian”) indicating a foreign origin.This rare composite samurai armor incorporates interesting elements made in this style as well as an original European helmet bowl mounted in Japanese...

TessenFighting fanMid Edo Period (1615 - 1867), Iron, paper with gold-leaf and bamboo.Menhari-gata (opening fan), sensu-gata (enlongated shape)Lenght: 38 cm. - Width open: 66.5 cm.Iron fan with an elegant shape, with eleven bamboo ribs.Of exceptionally long size, this samurai fan is painted in black, with a gold-foil rising sun on one side and a constellation on the other. The external iron plates are engraved with a dragon in the clouds on one side and a tiger in a bamboo forest on the other.Customarily carried in the hands or tucked in the obi (belt), the folding fan played a...

GunsenWar fanEdo Period (1615-1868)Lacquered wood, paper, gold foil, pigmentsSpoke length: 33.5 cmWide: 56 cm The outer spokes bring a gilt kamon (family crest) of mokko (melon) type.Folding military fans (gunsen) were used by samurai while camp during wartime. They usually have eight or sixteen tines, with a broader tine on either end. The sun and the moon, in gold or silver and crimson, adorn the fan’s faces. While their original function was straightforward- to cool the user in hot weather- folding fans were used for military purposes beginning in ancient times. During the...

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