japanese screens antique

A pair of six-panel folding screens; ink, color, gofun and gold leaf on paperKyoto Kano (Kyō-Kano) SchoolAttributed to Kano Sansetsu (1590-1651)Signature: SansetsuSeal: Jasokuken170 by 375 cm A gnarled cherry tree in full bloom and a snow-covered willow tree frame the composition of this pair of folding screens depicting flowers and trees in the four seasons. Red and white azaleas and low-growing bamboo grass (kumazasa) beneath the cherry tree complement the seasonal imagery of its pearly blossoms, while pink and white sasanquas and some sprays of marlberry (yabukōji) add touches of...

Edo period, 18th centuryPair of two-panel folding screens Ink, colors, gofun and gold leaf on paperEach 170 by 165 cm The term karamono is used to define ceramic, carvel lacquerware, furniture, bronzes and other decorative items imported from China. They became highly prized as imported curios, used in Japan as kazari - display items - and even the shōgun would install karamono in his chamber (zashiki) and invite members of the court and clergy to view them. Often karamono have been copied by Japanese craftsmen, so shapes from Chinese bronzes and porcelain have been used in Japan for...

Rakuchū Rakugai ZuViews of Kyoto

Edo period, mid 17th century

Pair of six-panel folding screens; ink, colors, and gold on paper
Each 121 by 282 cm  Folding screens depicting the ancient capital city of Kyoto and its surroundings (rakuchū rakugai zu) are among the most popular genres of Japanese painting. The broad surfaces of folding screens (byōbu) were ideally suited to the panoramic cityscape, as they afforded artists opportunities both to present sweeping vistas of the capital and to focus on details of everyday life in the city. Kyoto screens first appear in documents in the...

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