art japanese

Wood netsuke of hare
A wood netsuke of a hareHareBy Masanao, YamadaIse Province, 19th centuryWood netsuke; eyes inlaid in amberSigned: MasanaoLenght: 4.2 cm ProvenanceArlette Katchen collectionLiteratureA. Katchen, Netsuke 7, vol.2, Paris (K. R. Publishers, 2010), p. 141, no. K176 The hare is shown seated, its head raised and turned to the left, its forelegs outstretched and one hind leg forming the himotoshi.Ever present in Japanese folklore, and one of the twelve animals of the zodiac cycle, hares are a common theme for Japanese art. The term usagi can, in fact, be translated as both “rabbit...

Piccola teiera
Otagaki Regetsu e Kuroda KoryoTeapotOtagaki Rengestu (1791- 1875)Kuroda Koryo (1823-1895) with the artist’s seal5.7 x 12.8 cmLiterature:Poetry and Artwork from a Rustic Hut, Nomura Art Museum, Kyoto, 2014 pag 107The poem is incised by Otagaki Rengetsu (1791- 1875) while the teapot is by Kuroda Koryo (1823-1895) whose seal is impressed on the body of the pot, right to the spout. Made for steeped tea (sencha), the twin handles share the theme of two sprouts with the poem. The textured lid, patterned lid handle and intricately carved rim show Koryou’s unique sensibilities. ...

Nantembō Nakahara (1839-1925)“Hey, listen”, 1923Ink on paper, 117.5 x 30.5 cm Mounts 208 x 48 cm Nantembō’s handprint is a rare form of self-portrait and together a strong expression of zen art. In fact, the purpose of this kind of calligraphy is to awaken the viewer and this direct command together with the physical image of the hand is certainly able to reach our deep conscience.Hand prints had been used together with calligraphy in the Edo period and Tibetan abbots sometimes pressed their hands on the back of tanka scrolls in order to certify their blessings....

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