art japanese

Nantembō Nakahara (1839-1925)“Hey, listen”, 1923Ink on paper, 117.5 x 30.5 cm Mounts 208 x 48 cm Nantembō’s handprint is a rare form of self-portrait and together a strong expression of zen art. In fact, the purpose of this kind of calligraphy is to awaken the viewer and this direct command together with the physical image of the hand is certainly able to reach our deep conscience.Hand prints had been used together with calligraphy in the Edo period and Tibetan abbots sometimes pressed their hands on the back of tanka scrolls in order to certify their blessings....

Two panel folding screen with a winter landscapeLate Edo Period (1615-1867)171.5 x 187.5 cm The screen is decorated with a bamboo forest under a thick layer of snow.Bamboos are one of the favorites subjects in Japanese art since Muromachi period. Inspiring art and poetry, its appearance is elegant and the sound coming from the wind that creeps into its leaves is pleasant and relaxing. In zen philosophy, also, the bamboo has many different meanings: it bends but does not break, it is empty inside but hardy outside, and its section is a circular. In Japan this two elements, bamboo and...

Wood netsuke of hare
A wood netsuke of a hareHareBy Masanao, YamadaIse Province, 19th centuryWood netsuke; eyes inlaid in amberSigned: MasanaoLenght: 4.2 cm ProvenanceArlette Katchen collectionLiteratureA. Katchen, Netsuke 7, vol.2, Paris (K. R. Publishers, 2010), p. 141, no. K176 The hare is shown seated, its head raised and turned to the left, its forelegs outstretched and one hind leg forming the himotoshi.Ever present in Japanese folklore, and one of the twelve animals of the zodiac cycle, hares are a common theme for Japanese art. The term usagi can, in fact, be translated as both “rabbit...

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