piva wood

ShokiKyoto school18th 19th centuryStag antler netsukeHeight 7,8 cm Shoki is represented standing with his sword on his right hand. Shōki’s popularity peaked in Japan during the Edo period, when people began to hang images of Shōki outside their houses to ward off evil spirits during the Boys' Day festival and to adorn the eaves and entrances of their homes with ceramic statues of the deity. Today, Shōki is a minor deity relatively neglected or forgotten by most Japanese, except perhaps in Kyoto city, where residents still adorn the eaves and rooftops of their homes with...

Suzuribako
School of Ogawa Haritsu (1663-1747)Wooden suzuribako decorated with lacquer, lead, ceramic and raden insertsSigned: Kan saku, with the artist’s seal “Kan”19.5 cm x 23 cm x 4cmThis antique wooden writing box is decorated with an oi, the traditional yamabushi backpack, lying under a maple tree between different flowers. The interior is decorated with another maple tree from which comes out a young deer. Some of the leaves of both the trees are in different materials such as porcelain and raden, giving to the composition a great...

A wood netsuke of a ho-oby Toyokazu, 19th centuryWooden netsuke, eye inlaid in translucent hornDiameter: 4 cmSigned: Toyokazu Of Manju form, the ho-o shown with open beak as it flies, its openwork tail to one side and three large kiri leafs on the reverse. The ho-o is a mythological bird of East Asia that reigns over all other birds; It has very positive connotations: it is a symbol of high virtue and grace and represents the imperial house.Toyokazu was a carver of Tanba province, who was active from the mid- to late 19th century. He is thought to have been a pupil of...

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