kabuto helmet

Akoda-nari suji-bachi Unkai Mitsutane
16 plates akoda-nari suji-bachiSigned: Unkai Mitsusada deishi Mitsutane Edo period (1615-1867), circa 1780 Literature:- Sasama Y., Shin Kacchushi Meikan, 2000, pag. 212- Sasama Y., Katchu kantei hikkei, 1992, cat. 421- Sasama Y., Kacchushi Meikan, 1975, pag. 206- Sasama Y., Nihon no mei kabuto (Famous Japanese Helmets), vol. 3, 1972, pp. 158-159 Native to Kaga (Kanazawa), Fukuda Mitsutane in an armorer from the Unkai school, smiths in service of the Maeda clan, the richest Japanese family second only to the Shogun's. As in this...

Za-boshi kabuto16 plates samurai helmetMid Edo period (1615-1867), 18th centuryThis heavy helmet is typical of the work of the armor makers in the province of Kaga. Each plate is fitted with a row of nine rivets of diminishing size toward the top, with the exception of the front and rear plates, the former with three rows of za-boshi and the latter left empty. The rivet heads bear a chrysantemoid shaped washer at the base (za-boshi).The mabizashi (visor) and the fukigaeshi are decorated with applied printed Dutch leather tooled with a gilt design of stylized...

Hineno zunari kabutoHead-shaped samurai helmetEarly Edo period, 17th centuryThis samurai helmet is built with five iron plates that form a flat surface which has been lacquered in black. The neck guard (shikoro) of Hineno type comprises five plates and small fukigaeshi (turned-back portions).Antique samurai helmets of this type were originally made during the late Muromachi period and became popular for their functionality. With such a plain construction they were, in fact, easy to produce but could be made with thick and resistant iron plates. Due to its shape, this samurai helmet is often...

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