kabuto samurai

Ni-mai do tosei gusokuSecond half of Edo Period (1615-1867)19th CenturyHeight: 86 cmDuring the 17th Century samurai families used to display a set of helmet and armor, weapons and banners outdoors on the Tango-no-Sekku Festival (The Boy’s Festival), held on the fifth day of the fifth month, designated as an important ceremonial day by the Edo Shogunate Government. Later in the Edo period these items, except for the banners, were moved indoor, on rooms facing the street. The style of displaying varied in accordance and the armors gradually became miniaturized, thus keeping splendid...

Nagaeboshi Kawari KabutoSamurai Helmet designed as a court capMid Edo period Edo (1615 - 1867), 18th centuryThis spectacular helmet is meant to reproduce the cap worn by shinto priests. Of unusual shape, it is built of five iron riveted plates, covered with a textured gold lacquer and embossed with a red “ken” on the back. On the front, a rare triple maedate is supported by three different tsunomoto (supports).The shikoro is a rare kusari-shikoro made in three sections of chain mail under a wide black-lacquered plate molded as a lotus...

Two-fold screenInk, pigments and gofun on gilt silk.Signed: Sekka Hitsu with seal YoshitakaCirca 1920-40189 by 177,5 cm The screen depicts three varieties of chrysanthemums. Symbol of the imperial court, the chrysanthemum represents longevity and goodwill. Because of its auspicious meaning, the flower frequently appears on Japanese artworks of every kind.Painter and designer, Kamisaka Sekka has been one of the most important Japanese artist who brought the traditional aesthetic in western world. Sekka came from a samurai family - his father was in service at the imperial palace in Kyoto...

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